About

About

Motivation

Human civilisations have for millennia depended on the stability of groundwater resources to survive dry or unreliable climates. Groundwater is also significant part of the global hydrologic cycle and supplies fresh drinking water to almost half of the world’s population and supports streams, lakes, wetlands, ecology, aquatic communities, economic development and growth, agriculture, and other industry worldwide.  

While groundwater supplies are buffered against short-term effects of climate variability, they can be impacted over longer time frames through changes in rainfall, temperature, snowfall, melting of glaciers/permafrost, vegetation and land-use changes. Groundwater provides a low-resolution archive of past climate variation by recording changes in recharge amount or the chemical and isotopic evolutionary history of a groundwater system. The recharge history of a given groundwater resource is then vital to forecast its vulnerability under future and potentially adverse climatic changes.

Mission of G@GPS

The global G@GPS project uses existing information and fosters new investigations that aim to:

1. Compare and correlate major climatic events derived from groundwater with those obtained from higher resolution proxy records at the continental scale (individual basins) and global scale (between different basins).

 2. Apply this approach to large aquifers or regions where pre-existing research can be accessed and/or small number of additional analysis could add substantial value.  G@GPS will initially target emblematic aquifers “flag basins” in most continents, but will increase the number of basins targeted as new collaborations and research projects are developed. More information about flag basins here.

3. Establish a network of palaeogroundwater scientist that accelerates the transferring of knowledge to developing countries and junior scientists, development of research directions and systematic comparison of palaeogroundwater sytems. 

4. Evaluate potential future climate effects based on the palaeorecharge history of the studied basins. Several conceptualizations of basin response from the palaeogroundwater record will be modelled and compared. Provided data, the model’s response will be calibrated against data. Calculated response of modelled basins will also be used to identify data needs.

 5. Improve groundwater chronological frameworks past the 14C dating range (>30 ka in groundwater) and contribute to the use of novel “age or palaeoclimatic tracers” (i.e. 81Kr, noble gasses, 35S etc.).

 6. Establish a network of palaeogroundwater scientist that accelerates the transferring of knowledge to developing countries and junior scientists, development of research directions, and systematic comparison of palaeogroundwater sytems. To facilititate this, G@GPS will hold annual seminars/workshops.

Support 

G@GPS acknowledges the generous support from: